Impact of Compression Stockings vs. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Overnight Fluid Shift and Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Patients on Hemodialysis

Impact of Compression Stockings vs. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Overnight Fluid Shift and Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Patients on Hemodialysis

Author Silva, Bruno C. Google Scholar
Santos, Roberto S. S. Google Scholar
Drager, Luciano F. Google Scholar
Coelho, Fernando M. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Elias, Rosilene M. Google Scholar
Abstract Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in edematous states, notably in hemodialysis patients. In this population, overnight fluid shift can play an important role on the pathogenesis of OSA. The effect of compression stockings (CS) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on fluid shift is barely known. We compared the effects of CS and CPAP on fluid dynamics in a sample of patients with OSA in hemodialysis, through a randomized crossover study. Methods: Each participant performed polysomnography (PSG) at baseline, during CPAP titration, and after 1 week of wearing CS. Neck circumference (NC) and segmental bioelectrical impedance were done before and after PSG. Results: Fourteen patients were studied (53 9 years

57% men

body mass index 29.7 6.8 kg/m(2)). Apnea hypopnea index (AHI) decreased from 20.8 (14.2

39.6) at baseline to 7.9 (2.8

25.4) during CPAP titration and to 16.7 (3.5

28.9) events/h after wearing CS (CPAP vs. baseline, p = 0.004

CS vs. baseline, p = 0.017

and CPAP vs. CS, p = 0.017). Nocturnal intracellular trunk water was higher after wearing CS in comparison to baseline and CPAP (p = 0.03). CS reduced the fluid accumulated in lower limbs during the day, although not significantly. Overnight fluid shift at baseline, CPAP, and CS was -183 +/- 72, 343 +/- 220, and 290 +/- 213 ml, respectively (p = 0.006). Overnight NC increased at baseline (0.7 +/- 0.4 cm), decreased after CPAP (-1.0 +/- 0.4 cm), and while wearing CS (-0.4 +/- 0.8 cm) (CPAP vs. baseline, p < 0.0001

CS vs. baseline, p = 0.001

CPAP vs. CS, p = 0.01). Conclusion: CS reduced AHI by avoiding fluid retention in the legs, favoring accumulation of water in the intracellular component of the trunk, thus avoiding fluid shift to reach the neck. CPAP improved OSA by exerting local pressure on upper airway, with no impact on fluid redistribution. CPAP performed significantly better than CS for both reduction of AHI and overnight reduction of NC. Complementary studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which CPAP and CS reduce NC.
Keywords obstructive sleep apnea
compression stockings
continuous positive airway pressure
fluid shift
hemodialysis
xmlui.dri2xhtml.METS-1.0.item-coverage Lausanne
Language English
Sponsor Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo (FAPESP)
Date 2017
Published in Frontiers In Medicine. Lausanne, v. 4, p. -, 2017.
ISSN 2296-858X (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Frontiers Media Sa
Extent -
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2017.00057
Access rights Open access Open Access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000407112200001
URI https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/54454

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