Ocular gnathostomiasis in brazil: a case report

Ocular gnathostomiasis in brazil: a case report

Author Chaves, Claudia M. Google Scholar
Chaves, Claudio Google Scholar
Zoroquiain, Pablo Google Scholar
Belfort, Rubens, Jr. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Burnier, Miguel N., Jr. Google Scholar
Abstract Gnathostomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by nematode larvae ingestion of 15 known species of the genus Gnathostoma (one of the Gnathostomatidae family members). This parasite uses freshwater fish as a host and can infect - through the consumption of raw fish or their viscera - other animals such as dogs, cats, chickens, pigs, and humans. This parasitic disease, with humans acting as hosts, has been known since 1945 (India), and ocular complications have been known since 2004 (intravitreal

also described in India). Latin American countries, especially Mexico and Peru, have reported cases of the disease since 1970. The first dermatological case was reported in Brazil in 2009 (the individual had acquired the disease in Peru). This article describes the first reported ophthalmic case of the disease in Brazil and refers to a male patient, 30 years old, living in the municipality of Jurua, Amazonas State. The disease evolved within 30 days through a fistulized tumor in the inner corner of the lower eyelid. Following excision, the anatomical and histopathological examination revealed the presence of a different parasite species from other previously known genera. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel
Keywords Ocular Gnathostoma
Helminths
ParasitosisMexico
Travelers
Disease
Language English
Date 2016
Published in Ocular Oncology And Pathology. Basel, v. 2, n. 3, p. 194-196, 2016.
ISSN 2296-4681 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Acta Cirurgica Brasileira
Extent 194-196
Origin https://doi.org/10.1159/000444259
Access rights Open access Open Access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000381697600017
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/49450

Show full item record




File

File Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Search


Browse

Statistics

My Account