A comparison of plants utilized in ritual healing by two Brazilian cultures: Quilombolas and Kraho Indians

A comparison of plants utilized in ritual healing by two Brazilian cultures: Quilombolas and Kraho Indians

Author Rodrigues, Eliana Google Scholar
Carlini, E. A. Google Scholar
Institution Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Abstract The present study deals with two ethnobotanical surveys carried out in two different segments of the Brazilian population: the first among the Kraho Indians living in Tocantins State, a Cerrado region, and the second one among the descendants of former black slaves, the Quilombolas, living in Mato Grosso State. Both populations use plants which may have effects on the central nervous system (CNS) in their ritual healing ceremonies. Field work was performed during two years by one of the authors (E. Rodrigues) utilizing methods from botany and anthropology. Information was obtained on a total of 169 plants which were utilized in the preparation of 345 prescriptions for 68 ailments seemingly of the CNS, classified as tonics, analgesics, anorectics, hallucinogens, and anxiolytics. The taxonomic families of plants used, the more common therapeutic indications and types of healing rituals are discussed.
Keywords Brazilian folk healers
ethnopharmacology
healing ceremony
psychoactive plants
shaman
shamanism
Language English
Date 2006-09-01
Published in Journal Of Psychoactive Drugs. San Francisco: Haight-ashbury Publ, v. 38, n. 3, p. 285-295, 2006.
ISSN 0279-1072 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Haight-ashbury Publ
Extent 285-295
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02791072.2006.10399854
Access rights Closed access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000241819700009
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/11600/44600

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