The Potential of Secondary Metabolites from Plants as Drugs or Leads Against Protozoan Neglected Diseases - Part I

The Potential of Secondary Metabolites from Plants as Drugs or Leads Against Protozoan Neglected Diseases - Part I

Author Schmidt, T. J. Google Scholar
Khalid, S. A. Google Scholar
Romanha, A. J. Google Scholar
Alves, T. Ma. Google Scholar
Biavatti, M. W. Google Scholar
Brun, R. Google Scholar
Da Costa, F. B. Google Scholar
Castro, S. L. de Google Scholar
Ferreira, V. F. Google Scholar
Lacerda, M. V. G. de Google Scholar
Lago, Joao Henrique Ghilardi Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Leon, L. L. Google Scholar
Lopes, N. P. Google Scholar
Amorim, R. C. das Neves Google Scholar
Niehues, M. Google Scholar
Ogungbe, I. V. Google Scholar
Pohlit, A. M. Google Scholar
Scotti, M. T. Google Scholar
Setzer, W. N. Google Scholar
Soeiro, M. de N. C. Google Scholar
Steindel, M. Google Scholar
Tempone, Andre Gustavo Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Institution Univ Munster
Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC)
Fiocruz MS
Univ Basel
Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst STPH
Universidade de São Paulo (USP)
Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz
Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF)
Fundacao Med Trop Heitor Vieira Dourado
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Inst Nacl de Pesquisas da Amazonia
Univ Alabama
Univ Fed Paraiba
Adolfo Lutz Inst
Abstract Infections with protozoan parasites are a major cause of disease and mortality in many tropical countries of the world. Diseases caused by species of the genera Trypanosoma (Human African Trypanosomiasis and Chagas Disease) and Leishmania (various forms of Leishmaniasis) are among the seventeen Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) defined as such by WHO due to the neglect of financial investment into research and development of new drugs by a large part of pharmaceutical industry and neglect of public awareness in high income countries. Another major tropical protozoan disease is malaria (caused by various Plasmodium species), which -although not mentioned currently by the WHO as a neglected disease- still represents a major problem, especially to people living under poor circumstances in tropical countries. Malaria causes by far the highest number of deaths of all protozoan infections and is often (as in this review) included in the NTDs.The mentioned diseases threaten many millions of lives world-wide and they are mostly associated with poor socioeconomic and hygienic environment. Existing therapies suffer from various shortcomings, namely, a high degree of toxicity and unwanted effects, lack of availability and/or problematic application under the life conditions of affected populations. Development of new, safe and affordable drugs is therefore an urgent need.Nature has provided an innumerable number of drugs for the treatment of many serious diseases. Among the natural sources for new bioactive chemicals, plants are still predominant. Their secondary metabolism yields an immeasurable wealth of chemical structures which has been and will continue to be a source of new drugs, directly in their native form and after optimization by synthetic medicinal chemistry. The current review, published in two parts, attempts to give an overview on the potential of such plant-derived natural products as antiprotozoal leads and/or drugs in the fight against NTDs.
Keywords Neglected tropical diseases
Trypanosoma
Leishmania
Plasmodium
natural product
monoterpene
sesquiterpene
diterpene
triterpene
Language English
Sponsor German Ministry of Science and Education (BMBF)
Date 2012-05-01
Published in Current Medicinal Chemistry. Sharjah: Bentham Science Publ Ltd, v. 19, n. 14, p. 2128-2175, 2012.
ISSN 0929-8673 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Bentham Science Publ Ltd
Extent 2128-2175
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/092986712800229023
Access rights Closed access
Type Review
Web of Science ID WOS:000303381800005
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/11600/43449

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