Paid employment in subjects with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five Latin American cities: the PLATINO study

Paid employment in subjects with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five Latin American cities: the PLATINO study

Author Montes de Oca, Maria Google Scholar
Halbert, Ronald J. Google Scholar
Talamo, Carlos Google Scholar
Perez-Padilla, Rogelio Google Scholar
Lopez, Maria Varela Google Scholar
Muiño, Adriana Google Scholar
Jardim, Jose Roberto Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Valdivia, Gonzalo Google Scholar
Pertuze, Julio Google Scholar
Moreno, Dolores Google Scholar
Menezes, Ana Maria. Baptista Google Scholar
PLATINO Team Google Scholar
Institution Cent Univ Venezuela
Univ Calif Los Angeles
Inst Resp Dis
Univ Republica
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Pontificia Univ Catolica Chile
Univ Fed Pelotas
Abstract BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a costly condition that frequently causes permanent work disabilities. Little information exists regarding the impact of COPD on work force participation and the indirect costs of the disease in developing countries.OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency of paid employment and factors influencing it in a Latin-American population-based study.METHODS: Post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FVC < 0.70 (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity) was used to define COPD. Information regarding paid work was assessed by the question 'At any time in the past year, have you worked for payment?'RESULTS: Interviews were conducted with 5571 subjects; 5314 (759 COPD and 4554 non-COPD) subjects underwent spirometry. Among the COPD subjects, 41.8% reported having paid work vs. 57.1% of non-COPD (P < 0.0001). the number of months with paid work was reduced in COPD patients (10.5 +/- 0.17 vs. 10.9 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05). the main factors associated with having paid work in COPD patients were male sex (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.23-0.47), higher education level (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09) and younger age (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.88-0.92). COPD was not a significant contributor to employment (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69-1.00, P = 0.054) in the entire population.CONCLUSIONS: Although the proportion of persons with paid work is lower in COPD, having COPD appears not to have a significant impact on obtaining paid employment in the overall population of developing countries.
Keywords chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
epidemiology
indirect costs
economic burden
Language English
Sponsor Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH
Date 2011-09-01
Published in International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. Paris: Int Union Against Tuberculosis Lung Disease (i U A T L D), v. 15, n. 9, p. 1259-1264, 2011.
ISSN 1027-3719 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Int Union Against Tuberculosis Lung Disease (i U A T L D)
Extent 1259-1264
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.5588/ijtld.10.0508
Access rights Open access Open Access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000294520900022
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/33994

Show full item record




File

File Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Search


Browse

Statistics

My Account